About Steve Dunwell

Photographer, publisher, editor. Enthusiastic collector of images of Boston. Passionate follower of Boston history, including the Freedom Trail historic sites.

Paul Revere’s ride April 18

Revere statue by Cyrus Dallin

Paul Revere’s famous ride began tonight, April 18, 1775. The “Two if by Sea” lanterns confirmed what he had already learned: that the British troops would cross the Charles River in boats, landing in Cambridge and marching to Concord the next day. Revere crossed the river and road his horse towards Lexington. At the same time, William Dawes road another horse “by land”, via Watertown, to Lexington and Concord. On the following day – the 19th – Patriots and British soldiers clashed at both Lexington and at Concord.

 

British troops leave Boston

Aside

Evacuation Day in Boston marks the departure of the British on March 17, 1776, ending the 11-month “Siege of Boston.” Washington had surprised the British with new fortifications and cannons on Dorchester Heights. The “Evacuation” took troops and Tory citizens to Halifax, NS. Evacuation Day a local holiday In Boston, often combined with St. Patrick’s Day. This broadside by Paul Revere shows the troops arriving by ship in 1775.

Constitution is ratified, June 21

Constitution We the People

On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire ratified the US Constitution;  the 9th state to do so, thus meeting the necessary minimum.  At that point, the Constitution became the Law.

 

Paul Revere midnight ride

Revere statue by Cyrus Dallin

April 18th, 1775, Paul Revere arranged for the lantern signal, then was rowed across the Charles River to begin his midnight ride to Lexington to raise the alarm about the arrival there of British regular soldiers.

Evacuation Day – British leave Boston

Washington at Dorchester Heights

Evacuation Day in Boston marks the departure of the British on March 17, 1776, ending the 11-month “Siege of Boston.” This painting by Gilbert Stuart shows Washington at Dorchester Heights, where he surprised the British with new fortifications and cannons. The “Evacuation” took troops and Tory citizens to Halifax, NS. In Boston, Evacuation Day a local holiday, often combined with St. Patrick’s Day. Dorchester Heights is in South Boston.

Boston Massacre woodcut by Paul Revere

March 5, 1770. A snowy evening. A musket shot is fired. More shooting follows, killing five. This woodcut image by Paul Revere.

Frederick Douglass + Abolition on Boston Freedom Trail

Frederick Douglass birthday today. Black leader, abolitionist, orator; “The most photographed man in America” at that time. He lived in New Bedford, Nantucket, Lynn and Springfield, MA. Important connections to Boston. Born a slave, not knowing his actual birth date, he is honored today. The fight to end slavery and extend equal rights to African-Americans is part of the Freedom Trail story.

Ticknor & Fields at Old Corner Bookstore

Fields, Hawthorne, Ticknor

This group portrait shows 3 giants of Boston publishing. William Ticknor (right) and James T. Fields (left) operated the Ticknor & Fields publishing company at the Old Corner Bookstore at the corner of School and Washington Streets, Boston. Nathaniel Hawthorne (center) was one of their talented authors. His “Scarlet Letter” was published by T&F. Such hats, such coats! Photo by J.W. Black, whose photo studio was nearby.

Old Corner Bookstore – Augmented Reality AR

It has always been hard to imagine what the Old Corner Bookstore was like in the 1820s, when publisher Ticknor & Fields flourished here. Now you can see it on your iPad, with augmented reality overlays from “Look Again”, promoted by Historic Boston, Inc. Details here: http://www.historicboston.org/ar/

Trapped – not Free – 75th anniversary of Cocoanut Grove fire Boston

Cocoanut Grove book, Boston, MA

Nov 28, 1942. Fire at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub, in Boston’s Bay Village. 492 people died, most within minutes. Shown here, clippings and 3 of the survivors.